Work-Desk.net

Here For Your Office Furniture Needs !

richard@work-desk.net

Glass Table Tops3 Drawer File CabinetBlack Computer DeskBookcases With DoorsCheap Office FurnitureComputer Desk With Hutch

Corner Computer DesksDesks For Small SpacesDesk With HutchFile Cabinet LocksGlass Computer Desk

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Work Desk

 

Hello! My name is Richard Stone. I have worked in office environments for over 40 years, and I have created this site that is devoted to office furniture as a way to help consumers in their purchasing decisions when it comes to various items of office furniture. While I don't sell anything on this site, I do provide an abundance of information on computer desks, file cabinets, office chairs, and other important office furniture components. I try to give consumers ideas of what to look for when making their purchases and offer ideas as to where they can make those purchases. I would like to offer a special thanks to Kare_Products, who supplied the above photo that I proudly use on this website. More of this photographer's work can be found at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ergonomic_office/. Please continue to read below for some valuable information regarding the history of the work desk, and visit some of my other pages that are listed in the green navigation tables at the top and bottom of each page on this site.

 

A work desk is a contemporary piece of furniture that can be used at home, work, or school, with the purpose of reading, writing, or using a computer. This website will review the importance, history, and evolution of the work desk in today's society, and also offer content regarding other important items of office furniture.

Most work desk types today come in the form of a table with a flat writing surface, with drawers underneath on either side, allowing someone to sit in between. Some more popular work desk types come with shelving or cabinetry above the work desk writing surface to accommodate computer monitors, printers, books, etc.

 

The work desk has come a long way as it has been adapted extensively through the centuries to accommodate the ever-changing needs of society. Before the printing press was invented in the 1400s, books could only be written by hand. Because of this, the work desk of that time was quite massive in order to accommodate the size of some of the larger manuscripts being produced. By the 1500s, woodworking had improved to the point where the work desk was being built with drawers and storage cabinets. Through the 1700s, the work desk was refined to resemble the work desk styles that we are familiar with today.

 

With the introduction of mass-produced paper coinciding with the Industrial Revolution, mass production of the work desk went into full swing. By this point, the work desk made by steam-driven machinery and unskilled labor was favored over the work desk made by master craftsmen due to the increased demand for a functional, economical work desk that could be produced quickly. At this point, the work desk was no longer a status symbol like it used to be. The increased production and use of paper led to the design of work desk types with pigeonholes, and eventually filing cabinets to store important documents without taking up frequently used work space.

 

Up until the 1900s, almost every work desk was made out of some type of wood. However, with the advent of the typewriter came the work desk made from steel. The steel work desk was more effective in supporting the weight of the typewriter and even more paper. The typewriter was also credited with the invention of the L-shaped work desk. In addition to the steel work desk, other work desk types were made from cheap materials like plywood and fiberboard.

 

In the 1980s, the work desk was adapted to accommodate computer monitors, which led to the creation of the U-shaped work desk. In the 1990s, more work desk modifications were made to accommodate printers, scanners, and other peripheral equipment.  During the 1990s, the cubicle work desk began to take hold as more workers were placed in a certain amount of space. With this work desk design, workers would attach papers and notes to the walls of the cubicle to make room on the work desk surface for computers and other accessories.

 

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Glass Table Tops3 Drawer File CabinetBlack Computer DeskBookcases With DoorsCheap Office FurnitureComputer Desk With Hutch

Corner Computer DesksDesks For Small SpacesDesk With HutchFile Cabinet LocksGlass Computer Desk

Leather Desk PadL Shaped Computer DeskOffice Chair PartsOffice Decorating Ideas

Portable Laptop TableReclining Office ChairSalon Reception Desk

Table And ChairsWhite Office Chair

Work-Desk.net

Here For Your Office Furniture Needs !

richard@work-desk.net